Slowing Down The Baseball Games

photo by Ceetar

The Mets beat the Marlins in less than two hours last night.

 

That’s too fast.

 

I’m all for avoiding unnecessary delays. I think calls should stand if a review takes more than two minutes to get right. I’m fully on-board with the between innings game clock that makes sure things move along like they should.

 

This game was too fast. Part of the allure of baseball, particularly of a tied 0-0 game going into the later innings, is the perpetual battle that happens pitch by pitch. A 3-1 pitch could be the start of a rally. A hanging curve could be the one mistake that gets hit out of the park. This game went too fast to really absorb any of that. Just as you’re getting settled in, it’s getting late. It became a race instead of a duel and Dillon Gee faded first. Admittedly, he was tired and this is where the Mets offense failed. When your pitcher has thrown 50 pitches in roughly 10 minutes, it would behoove the Mets to take a few pitches and try to work some deep counts. Draw a few throws at first when you do happen to get on. Dillon Gee’s pace was great, but the Mets needed to do more to disrupt Cosart’s.

 

I wonder what’s more taxing for an arm? 70 pitches into the eight in 90 minutes, or 105 with a more normal cadence and rest between innings?

 

While endless delay tactics, stepping out of the box, throwing to first, catchers visiting the mound, and all the other tricks guys pull can often be tiresome, sometimes the mind games of trying to throw someone off their rhythm is part of the fun. I almost feel cheated. I expect 150-180+ minutes of baseball every night and the Mets and Marlins couldn’t even get me 120.

 

Still, a win is a win. The Mets have the best record in baseball, Murphy’s starting to shake off the rust and David Wright might only be a week to ten days away. Things are looking up.

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